CABLE TELEVISION THE HAPPINESS SHOW STREAMING INTERNET

Happiness Information, Resources, and Over One Hundred Free Online Shows
Produced by George Ortega
Hosted by: George Ortega, Lionel Ketchian, Aymee Coget, and Claudia B.

Home

Producer's Choice

 21 Ways to Become Happier

12 Ways to a Happier World


This site is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Michael W. Fordyce, 12/14/44 - 01/24/11, whose pioneering work created the happiness movement we enjoy today.  Heaven and Earth are happier places because of you.  Thanks, and stay happy forever and ever.

Quick Clicks to the Shows: 1-20   21-40   41-60   61-80   81-100   101-120   121-138    

 This site averages over 200,000 visits per year 

 

HAPPINESS BY KNOWING FREE WILL IS AN ILLUSION!

I explained how overcoming belief in free will can boost happiness on episode 7 Happiness and the Determinism vs. Free Will Question, 4-20-03, and 92 A Conversation about Happiness, Free Will and Determinism, 2-28-05

John Searle, the13th ranked post-1900 philosopher, says that our world overcoming the free will illusion "would be a bigger revolution in our thinking than Einstein, or Copernicus, or Newton, or Galileo, or Darwin -- it would alter our whole conception of our relation with the universe." 
 


Find out why at
my new show,
 Exploring the Illusion of Free Will

 

 

 

Who We Are
Watch for free our over 130 shows in Google Video, windows streaming media and mpeg

Watch for free our over 30 "producer's choice" shows

What is Happiness?

   Why is Happiness so Important?

World's Happiest Countries

Happiness Facts

Happiness Benefits

The APACHE Method (Positive Adjectives Technique and List)

The Ortega Happiness Method

Other Ways of Becoming Happier

Happiness Increase Experiments

Top Happiness Researchers and Promoters

Dr. M. Fordyce

George Ortega's Happiness Skills Theory (2 drafts)

Happiness Books, Papers and Articles

Start a Happiness Show

Happiness-Increase Research and the Artifacts Dilemma

Happiness Research Still Needed

Proposals for Further Refuting Hedonic Adaptation Predictions

The Hey Bill Gates, Start an International Happiness Corporation Campaign

Happiness Increase International

George's Happy World Songs

Humankind's Age of Happiness

Happiness Quotes

100 Happiness Self-Statements

Outlines to Early The Happiness Show Episodes

Watch us from home TV

Site Map


Key Happiness Facts
 

World's Happiest Countries:
 
1. Nigeria
 2. Mexico
 3. Venezuela
 4. El Salvador
 5. Puerto Rico
 (U.S. ranks 16th)

Countries with Highest Levels of Subjective Well-Being:
 
1. Puerto Rico
 2. Mexico
 3. Denmark
 4. Columbia
 5. Ireland

Click here for the complete ranking and more information

Americans consider happiness more important to them than money, moral goodness, and even going to Heaven.

Americans are, on average, only 69 percent happy.

The world population is, on average, less than 65 percent happy.

37 percent of the people on Forbes list of Wealthiest Americans are less happy than the average American.

At any given time, one forth of Americans are mildly depressed

14 percent of the nations on Earth are less than 50 percent happy.

Happiness Increase Experiments published in peer review journal have empirically demonstrated that individuals can be trained to be 25 percent happier through various training programs in from two to ten weeks.

All demographic variables combined, including age, sex, income, race, and education, are responsible for only 15 percent of the difference in happiness levels between individuals.

American Children feel happy 52 percent of the time, neutral 29 percent of the time, and unhappy 19 percent of the time.

Americans' personal income has increased more than 2 1/2 times over the last 50 years, but their happiness level has remained the same.

Americans earning more that $10 million annually are only slightly happier than average Americans.

(Click here for Citations and a Brief Paper on How our World Can Become Much Happier)



Top
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE BENEFITS OF HAPPINESS

A growing body of research has shown that as people become happier, they become:

More likely to benefits their families, their  communities and society at large

  

        Lyubomirsky, S., King, L. A., & Diener, E. (2002). Is happiness a good thing? The benefits of long-term positive affect. Manuscript in preparation.  

 

Straight to Benefits List

 

         More likely to be more cooperative, prosocial and charitable

 

       Cunningham, M. R., Shaffer, D. R., Barbee, A. P., Wolff, P. L., & Kelley, D. J. (1990). Separate processes in the relation of elation and depression to helping: Social versus personal concerns. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 26, 13-33.

 

 

        Isen, A. M. (1970). Success, failure, attention and reaction to others: The warm glow of success. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 15, 294-301.

 

 

       Kasser, T., & Ryan, R. M. (1996). Further examining the American dream: Differential correlates of intrinsic and extrinsic goals. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 22, 280-287.

 

        Williams, S., & Shiaw, W. T. (1999). Mood and organizational citizenship behavior: The effects of positive affect on employee organizational citizenship behavior intentions. Journal of Psychology, 133, 656-668.

 

Straight to Benefits List

 

 

    More likely to enjoy superior work outcomes

  • Greater Creativity

  • Increased Productivity

  • Higher Quality of Work

  • Higher Income

       Estrada, C., Isen, A. M., & Young, M. J. (1994). Positive affect influences creative problem solving and reported source of practice satisfaction in physicians. Motivation and Emotion, 18, 285-299.

 

       George, J. M. (1995). Leader positive mood and group performance: The case of customer service. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 25, 778-795.

 

        Staw, B. M., Sutton, R. I., & Pelled, L. H. (1995). Employee positive emotion and favorable outcomes at the workplace. Organization Science, 5, 51-71.

 

   Straight to Benefits List

 

 More likely to have a stronger immune system

 

Dillon, K. M., Minchoff, B., & Baker, K. H. (1985). Positive emotional states        and enhancement of the immune system. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 15, 13-18.

 

        Stone, A. A., Neale, J. M., Cox, D. S., Napoli, A., Vadlimarsdottir, V., & Kennedy-Moore, E. (1994). Daily events are associated with a secretory immune response to an oral antigen in men. Health Psychology, 13, 440-446.  

 

Straight to Benefits List

 

More likely to live longer

 

 

       Danner, D. D., Snowdon, D. A., & Friesen, W. V. (2001). Positive emotions in early life and longevity: Findings from the nun study. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 804-813.

 

       Maruta, T., Colligan, R. C., Malinchoc, M., & Offord, K. P. (2000). Optimists vs. pessimists: Survival rate among medical patients over a 30-year period. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 75, 140-143.

 

       Ostir, G. V., Markides, K. S., Black, S. A., & Goodwin, J. S. (2000). Emotional well-being predicts subsequent functional independence and survival. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 48, 473-478.

 

  

    Straight to Benefits List

 

 

More likely to enjoy larger social rewards

  • More likely to marry

  • Less likely to become divorced

  • More likely to have more friends

  • More likely to enjoy stronger social support

  • More likely to enjoy richer social interactions   

       Berry, D. S., & Hansen, J. S. (1996). Positive affect, negative affect, and social interaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 796-809.

 

       Harker , L., & Keltner, D. (2001). Expressions of positive emotions in women’s college yearbook pictures and their relationship to personality and life outcomes across adulthood. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 112-124.

 

       Marks, G. N., & Fleming, N. (1999). Influences and consequences of well-being among Australian young people: 1980-1995. Social Indicators Research, 46, 301-323.

 

       Okun, M. A., Stock, W. A., Haring, M. J., & Witter, R. A. (1984). The social activity/subjective well-being relation: A quantitative synthesis. Research on Aging, 6, 45-65.

       

Straight to Benefits List

 

 

 More likely to be more emotionally healthy

 

     Diener, E. (1984). Subjective well-being. Psychological Bulletin, 95, 542-575.

    

        Jahoda, M. (1958). Current concepts of positive mental health. New York: Bax

 

        Menninger, K. A. (1930). What is a healthy mind? In N. A. Crawford and K. A. Menninger (Eds.), The healthy-minded child. New York: Coward-McCann.

 

        Taylor, S. E., & Brown, J. D. (1988). Illusion and well-being: A social psychological perspective on mental health. Psychological Bulletin, 103, 193-210.  

 

Straight to Benefits List

 

 

More likely to be more active, and have greater energy and flow

 

 

       Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Wong, M. M. (1991). The situational and personal correlates of happiness: A cross-national comparison. In F. Strack, M. Argyle, & N. Schwarz (Eds.), Subjective well-being: An interdisciplinary perspective (pp. 193-212). Elmsford, NY: Pergamon Press.

 

 

       Mishra, S. (1992). Leisure activities and life satisfaction in old age: A case study of retired government employees living in urban areas. Activities, Adaptation and Aging, 16, 7-26.

 

 

       Watson, D., Clark, L. A., McIntyre, C. W., & Hamaker, S. (1992). Affect, personality, and social activity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 1011-1025.

   

Straight to Benefits List

 

 

Less likely to show symptoms of psychopathology

  • Less Depression

  • Less Suicide

  • Less Paranoia

       Diener, E., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2002). Very happy people. Psychological Science, 13, 81-84.

 

        Koivumaa-Honkanen, H., Honkanen, R., Viinamaeki, H., Heikkilae, K., Kaprio, J., & Koskenvuo, M. (2001). Life satisfaction and suicide: A 20-year follow-up study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 158, 433-439.

   

   Straight to Benefits List

 

  

More likely to exhibit greater self-control and coping abilities

 

 

       Aspinwall, L. G. (1998). Rethinking the role of positive affect in self-regulation. Motivation and Emotion, 22, 1-32.

 

        Carver, C. S., Pozo, C., Harris, S. D., Noriega, V., Scheier, M., Robinson, D., Ketcham, A., Moffat Jr., A., & Clark, K. (1993). How coping mediates the effect of optimism on distress: A study of women with early stage breast cancer. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 375-390.

 

       Chen, C. C., David, A., Thompson, K., Smith, C., Lea, S., & Fahy, T. (1996). Coping strategies and psychiatric morbidity in women attending breast assessment clinics. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 40, 265-270.

 

        Fredrickson, B. L., & Joiner, T. (2002). Positive emotions trigger upward spirals toward emotional well-being. Psychological Science 13, 172-175.

 

        Keltner, D., & Bonanno, G. A. (1997). A study of laughter and dissociation: Distinct correlates of laughter and smiling during bereavement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73, 687-702.

 

 

Straight to Benefits List

 

 

 

This list, and the citations, were excerpted from a citations list compiled by Ken Sheldon, Sonja Lyubomirsky, and David Schkade

 

Top